INSPIRATION FOR THE MIND, HEART, AND SOUL

+ sierra

The inmyskin Project now presents a talk with sierra:

one: what is your name and where are you located ?

S - Sierra.  The heart of the south, Atlanta, GA

two: what do you feel is your calling in life ?

S - My calling, I believe is to be a storyteller. And to tell stories of people's lives and truths. I just want to remind others that this life is worth living. 

three: when did you realize your self-worth and how has this journey of self-discovery been for you ? what have you learned the most about yourself ?

S - Of course it is the most cliche moment of the girlhood story where someone breaks your heart. But that is in fact what happened. A relationship ended with whom I thought was the love of my life. Afterwards I had to put myself back together. I had to figure who I was. I was so focused on that person that I had no idea who I was. Then one day I said to myself, "You didn't lose a person, you lost yourself." That changed my mindset to begin the journey of her, a beautiful one might I add. It has been one of ups and downs. Although I say it is beautiful, I will not lie some days are ugly. I have learned to be okay with those ugly days, to not exclude and repress those feelings. The most that I have learned about myself up until this point is how I communicate and the value of communicating your truth. 

four: how has your struggles helped you to become a better woman ?

S - I like to call them lessons. Everything that I have gone through has been a lesson to teach me about the world, teach me about myself and how those two interact. The have helped me realize that I am the most important thing. When you place yourself at the center of your life, everything else falls into place. I was diagnosed with Grave's Disease when I was 12 years old. And then also learn in my 22nd year that I had Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome. Both of which shaped my girlhood and defined who I was as a woman. With Grave's Disease features such as my eyes and neck were enlarged. At a point in my life where your outward appearance as an teenager played a important role in how you were treated. I believed that I wasn't beautiful. It was a truth because I wasn't the 'ideal' pretty that all the others girls were. Due to my PCOS, which I didn't know of until later, I've always had excessive facial and body hair. And to be taunted about it or be called a man was never an easy pill to swallow. I would try so hard to be the picture of the girl that everyone wanted. Even as a tomboy at heart, I wore my smaller and v-cut shirts that would place emphasis on my growing breasts. My pants were never the right size either too baggy or too tight. I tried to change my hair to hide my eyes and my neck. Always trying to fit myself into these spaces that I didn't belong. 

It wasn't until later on that I understood that I am the only one that should be defining my womanhood. That I don't have to be someone else's pretty or their version of what feminine is. I am mine and my pretty is enough. It took a lot of writing and reassuring myself to believe this. This ultimately has been my greatest lesson as a woman. 

five: who or what motivates you to create ?

S - God. Life. Love. People.

six: what is your long time passion in life ?

S - To live life abundantly. 

seven: if you could give any tips or advice to the young girls and women around the world who suffer with loving and accepting who they are, what would you say ?

S - Find an affirmation that you can wake up and tell yourself. Do that every single day. Find people who see beyond the point that you're at in your life, those people see who will become and will remind you of that. 

eight: what do you feel needs to be told to our beautiful women of color ? do you feel that us women of color hear those words often ? if not, what can we do as a community to change that. . .

S - "Take up all the space that you require. Don't allow anything or anyone to make you small." I think it is being said but it cannot be repeated enough. There are communities and spaces that exist for women of color, the work just has to be continued. 

Are there any social media links that you'd like to share, if so please do not hesitate to leave the links down below. 

S - Twitter: @sierrachas